Languages
banner 1 banner 2 banner 3
ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL PRODUCTS, EQUIPMENT, SYSTEMS & APPLICATIONS
ENGINEERING, CONTRACTING , CONSULTING, INSTALLATION , SITE SUPERVISION AND OVERSEAS PROJECT FACILITATING SERVICES
LOW VOLTAGE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION SYSTEMS
DANGEROUS GOODS SAFETY ADVISER ( DGSA )
CERTIFICATION SERVICES FOR RUSSIA AND CIS COUNTRIES
DANGEROUS GOODS SAFETY ADVISER ( DGSA )
You must have a dangerous goods safety adviser (DGSA) if you transport dangerous goods
 
1. Overview
 
If you want to transport dangerous goods, there are rules on how to pack and label them and the training your staff must have.
 
You may also need to have a dangerous goods safety adviser (DGSA).
 
Packaging and labelling
 
Dangerous goods must be packaged and labelled appropriately. If you have aDGSA they will tell you about the requirements.
 
2. Dangerous goods classes
 
Dangerous goods are separated into different classes which affect how you must package and transport them. If you're only shipping limited quantities the rules aren't as strict.
 
CLASSIFICATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS
2. Dangerous goods classes
 
Class Type of material
1 Explosive substances and articles
2.1 Flammable gas (e.g. butane)
2.2 Non-flammable and non-toxic gases which could cause asphyxiation (eg nitrogen, helium,       carbon dioxide) or oxidizers (e.g. oxygen)
2.3

Toxic gases (e.g. chlorine, phosgene)

3 Flammable liquids (e.g. lighter fluid, petrol)
4.1 Flammable solids, self-reactive substances and solid desensitized explosives
4.2

Substances liable to spontaneous combustion

4.3

Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases

5.1 Oxidizing substances
5.2 Organic peroxides
6.1 Toxic substances
6.2 Infectious substances
7 Radioactive material
8 Corrosive substances
9 Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles
 
The consignor or sender is responsible for classifying, packaging and marking any dangerous goods to be transported.
 
Clinical waste
 
You must be registered as a waste carrier to carry clinical waste, eg from a hospital or veterinary surgery. The Health and Safety Executive website has details of packaging and labelling of containers for clinical waste.
 
3. Packaging
 
Before you order any packaging make sure that the supplier sends you:
• a copy of the certificate
• information ('datasheets') on how to use the packaging properly
• any test reports for the selected packaging
 
4. Dangerous goods safety adviser
 
You must have a dangerous goods safety adviser (DGSA) if you transport dangerous goods unless:
• you only do it occasionally, eg breakdown recovery vehicles
• you're only receiving the dangerous goods (you're the 'consignee')
• they're in 'limited quantities'
• you're moving them a very short distance by road, eg between buildings on an industrial estate
• you're using private vehicles
 
5. Rules for transport by road and sea
 
By road
The internationally agreed rules for transporting dangerous goods by road are covered by 'ADR 2015'.
There's a range of fixed penalty fines if your cargo fails a spot check.
 
By sea
You need to complete a dangerous goods notification for any dangerous goods you want to send by sea.
The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) code and the Maritime provide guidance on transporting dangerous goods by sea.
You can be fined for breaking the regulations on transporting dangerous goods. You can be prosecuted and face a large fine and a prison sentence for serious breaches, eg transporting animal by-products in an unsafe way.
 
6. Transporting limited quantities
 
You don't need to follow all the normal packaging and labelling regulations, and you don't need a dangerous goods safety adviser if you're transporting 'limited quantities' of some dangerous goods.
 
Packing limited quantities
Goods shipped in limited quantities must be carried in small containers (eg bottles), which are then packed in boxes or on shrink-wrapped trays.
The maximum weight is 30kg for boxes, or 20kg for shrink-wrapped trays. The maximum weight for the individual containers depends on the type of goods.
These limits are listed in column 7a of the 'Dangerous goods list' in part 3 of ADR.
For certain goods, the limit in column 7a of Table A is zero. These goods can't be shipped as limited quantities.